Current North Lighthouse Built

Current North Lighthouse Built

In 1829, the first North Light was built at Sandy Point on the north end of the island.  It was replaced in 1837 after it was washed out to sea. In 1857 a third lighthouse was also claimed by the ocean.  In 1867, the granite block lighthouse that can be seen today was constructed. It is located a half mile walk across a sand beach from the parking area at Settlers’ Rock. The Town of New Shoreham runs a small Interpretive Center on the first floor with lifesaving displays on loan from the Historical Society. Please call them for hours as they are only open depending on weather and staffing. The Historical Society offers special tours to the site and includes information about both lighthouses.

Island occupied by Navy

Island occupied by Navy

During The War of 1812 Block Island was briefly occupied by the British Navy under the command of Sir Thomas Hardy. British vessels included HMS DispatchHMS TerrorHMS NimrodHMS Pactolus and HMS Ramillies. Hardy took the fleet to Block Island in search of food and to establish a strategic position at the mouth of Long Island Sound. The British were enraged to discover that virtually all Block Island livestock and food stores had been transferred to Stonington, Connecticut in advance of their arrival. On August 9, 1814, Hardy and his fleet departed Block Island for Stonington Harbor in part to lay claim to the Block Island food stores and livestock. Hardy’s pre-dawn raid on 10 August was repulsed with damage to his fleet in a battle that has since become known as The Battle of Stonington.

On the north end of the island is “Wash Pond” named for the location the British did their laundry. Beacon Hill was also used as a look out at that time. Visit the Museum to see our slide show on the history of the Beacon Hill tower and home. The mapping exhibit room has a DeBeers map from 1774 showing the depths around the island produced for the British navy.

New Shoreham established by Gen.Assembly

New Shoreham established by Gen.Assembly

Block Island was incorporated by the Rhode Island general assembly in 1672, and the island government adopted the name “New Shoreham.” A Dutch map of 1685 clearly shows Block Island, indicated as Adrian Block Island (“Adriaen Blocks Eylant”).

 

Europeans Settle BI

Europeans Settle BI

IMG_4123

In 1661, the Endicott group sold the island to a party of sixteen settlers, led by John Alcock, who are today memorialized at Settler’s Rock, near Cow’s Cove.

Endicott Expedition

Endicott Expedition

An expedition from the Boston area arrived in 1636 led by Colonel John Endicott. Due to this event, the island initially became part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which in 1658 granted it to a group of four men headed up by Endicott, who had led the expedition. They were avenging the death of Boston trader, Captain John Oldham, who unfairly traded sacks of sand instead of grain to the Manisseans. This event also was used to start the King Phillip War. In 1660 the island was sold to sixteen the purchasers and settlers. Their names are listed on a commemorative rock on the north end of the island where their shallop came ashore and where they named “Cow Cove” for the cattle they brought and which swam ashore at this location.

 

Colonists_on_block

An image of Massachusetts colonists attacking the Eastern Niantic on the isle of Manisses in 1637.

From History of Pilgrims and Puritans, Vol. 3 by Joseph Dillaway Sawyer

 

Natives_on_block

The Niantic (tribe) defending themselves on Block Island in the summer of 1637.